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Diseases Immunology Oncology

The PanDIA-1 Study, for Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer in Newly Onset Type 2 Diabetics, Moves Into Next Phase

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The PanDIA-1 Study, for Early Detection of Pancreatic Cancer in Newly Onset Type 2 Diabetics, Moves Into Next Phase | Pharmtech Focus

Immunovia today announced the PanDIA-1 study for the early detection of pancreatic cancer in newly onset type 2 diabetics is moving into the next phase. Samples with the associated clinical data have been transferred to Immunovia from Lund University Diabetes Center (LUDC). During the second half of 2022 the samples will be analyzed as the next phase of the development plan for this large risk group.

“We are entering into a decisive phase of the PanDIA study, aiming to give another substantial risk group for pancreatic cancer the ability to get access to early detection. The prevalence of diabetes is dramatically increasing worldwide, and newly diagnosed diabetics have an up to 8 times higher risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. It is imperative that we change the paradigm, offer those individuals an option to get tested and allow them to benefit from treatment options available if diagnosed early”, said Philipp Mathieu, CEO and President of Immunovia AB.

Immunovia started PanDIA-1 in January 2018 and it is one of the largest, comprehensive prospective sample collections for early detection of pancreatic cancer in new onset type 2 diabetics. 6,000 samples have been collected from the same number of new onset diabetes patients, of which approximately 4,800 are above the age of 50 years. The samples were collected from new onset diabetic patients starting at the time of diabetes diagnosis over a 3-year period thereafter, which is the time span during which patients with new-onset diabetes type 2 have a dramatically higher risk of developing pancreatic cancer.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates more than 37 million Americans have diabetes and approximately 90-95% of them have type 2 diabetes.

The Center for Disease Control and Prevention estimates more than 37 million Americans have diabetes and approximately 90-95% of them have type 2 diabetes.

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