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A Non-Invasive Digital Therapeutic, JOGO-Gx, Shows Early Success in Treating Parkinson’s Disease Symptoms

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A Non-Invasive Digital Therapeutic, JOGO-Gx, Shows Early Success in Treating Parkinson's Disease Symptoms | Pharmtech Focus

JOGO-Gx, a non-invasive digital therapeutic built with AI and wearables that taps into the neuroplasticity of the brain using biofeedback, shows early success as a Parkinson’s Disease treatment. An uncurable progressive nerve system illness, Parkinson’s affects more than 10 million people worldwide with symptoms such as uncontrollable tremors and muscular rigidity. Existing medications for treating Parkinson’s have severe side effects, and often become less effective with time – leaving sufferers of this disease with few options.

JOGO-Gx has already shown a 70% tremor reduction among initial trial participants using the device at least two times a week. “JOGO-Gx taps into the natural neuroplasticity of the central nervous system (CNS) using electromyographic (EMG) biofeedback. Think of neuroplasticity as GPS. In a traffic jam, you will be redirected to reach your destination. Same happens in the brain, where alternate neuronal pathways are created to gain control over affected muscles. By training the brain to relax via biofeedback, we are able to help patients control their tremors naturally. JOGO-Gx is non-invasive and does not emit electric signals,” says Chief Scientific Officer, Gary Krasilovsky, Ph.D. Gary is an industry veteran and researcher who studied biofeedback-driven neuroplasticity of the central nervous system for over 40 years.

Hugh Fitzpatrick, who has been using JOGO-Gx for around a month, discusses his experience with the digital therapeutic: “JOGO-Gx has reduced my tremors considerably. I am able to sleep better after using JOGO-Gx before going to bed. I rarely need to take my sleep medication anymore.”

Conducted in collaboration with Parkinson’s People, a UK-based organization that raises awareness about and supports those with the disease, the trial will assess a total of 40 Parkinson’s patients in the US and UK with a three-month observation. Russ Bradford, who co-founded the group with his wife, Charlotte, remarks, “We are delighted to work with JOGO on their initial trial with People with Parkinson’s to see who can benefit from the JOGO-Gx digital solution. It’s proving to help alleviate symptoms such as tremors. We know that people living with Parkinson’s need to tackle their symptoms on a personal level, and this is something JOGO-Gx can offer. The device could also possibly help with pain and incontinence, which are other Parkinson’s symptoms. The real benefit would be that JOGO-Gx does not require taking more medication, and could even help people reduce the medication they’re currently prescribed. Watch this space.”

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